Exploring Tarot Using Radiant Rider-Waite Tarot (Deck and Book)

Exploring Tarot Using Radiant Rider-Waite Book Cover Exploring Tarot Using Radiant Rider-Waite
Avia Venefica
New Age/Divination/Tarot
U.S. Games Systems, INC.
September 28th 2015
Deck and book kit
Publisher

This deck/book set provides everything you need to understand tarot. The full-size deck is a vibrantly recolored version of the classic Rider-Waite deck, updated with subtle shading that gives depth to the familiar tarot scenes. The 272-page, user-friendly handbook with full-color illustrations is perfect for beginners as well as experienced readers who want to refresh their tarot skills.

U. S. Games Systems, INC.

U. S. Games Systems is one of the main publishers of Tarot decks, New Age oracle cards and books. You can’t go into the New Age section of your bookstore and not see U.S. Games’ products staring back at you. And, hey, when it catches your eye, you better believe that you ought to get that now. I have yet to be disappointed in one of their oracle decks. (I also reviewed Under the Roses Lenormand and The Halloween Tarot by them earlier.)

U.S. Games Systems, INC. sent me the book and deck set of The Radiant Rider-Waite tarot. Early on in my practice of reading tarot and, eventually, reviewing, I revised to get The Rider Waite Tarot deck. I insisted on using my Steampunk Tarot deck as I struggled through Review book after review book and I learned next to nothing about reading tarot.

The rider Waite was, to my naïve and untrained eye, too ”boring.” Why look at basic pictures of normal, everyday characters even I could be studying the Gods of the Machine instead?

I have that answer now:

because to learn how to do something well, you have to learn from the best. And, for that matter, the more I look at the RW cards the more I see in the picture that I may have missed before. 

The bulk of this review will center around the book that came with this kit because I’ve already posted a (sub-par) review of the deck. However, there is a major difference between the original deck and the radiant riser Waite deck: this deck is much more, well, Radiant. The intensified colors bring out the beauty in a basic, but powerful, Tarot deck. While there illustrations stay true to form, the quality of the illustrations is superb. 

Along came the book…

The first thing I noticed when I took the book out of the kit in which it rests, was that it was heavy. Heavier than most books, or, a comparison would be The Darkest Minds. It’s heavy in the way that The Wonderbook is. When I opened it I understood why. Every page is in radiant, high color glossy paper that makes the pictures of the cards and the subsections within the book stand out. 

Another part about the book that I noticed early on was that the subsections under each card is colored. There are graphs and highlights, side notes that shine and quotes that line the bottom of the page to give the reader a deeper understanding. The quote at the bottom of each of the cards’ pages reminded me of my Angel cards; little snippets that give you a direct insight into the Angel that is speaking to you.

The book is divided into three sections. The first is The Beginning. In The Beginning, the author explores everything from intuition and it’s role in reading the Tarot to a “glossary of Tarot-Related Terms.” Then as per usual, the book delved into the major arcana, then the minor arcana (or, “pip” cards), ending in a series of “spreads for specific questions.”

The spreads section gives the layout and explains in great detail how that spread works, what the answers will represent, and instructions for setting up the spread. Then, following the spread in great detail, the book gives a sample spread with specific cards randomly drawn. In that sample spread, the author walks you through each card and what they represent and includes sample readings of each spread, card-by-card. At the end of the sample question, it provides more ways to, for example, forecast the querents finances. In the forecast, one of the ways to read your cards is during a specific phase of the moon or, for instance, using a single card.

Get this kit…

If you’re a beginner to the Tarot and even if you’re an experienced reader. This is an absolute and essential tool for learning to read the Rider-Waite card. From quick readings for popular questions to instructions for reading and using spreads, Exploring Tarot Using Radiant Rider-Waite delves into the most detail of any of my Tarot books.

Exploring Tarot is now my staple Tarot book and so, too, is the Radiant Rider-Wait deck. As I said before, to learn the Tarot it’s essential that you learn from an expert (i.e. this book) is one of them, with the cards being the greatest tool of them all. As much as I love specialty decks, I now know that the Radiant Rider-Waite is the best source of Tarot knowledge I’ve come across in my years of reading Tarot books and studying the decks.

For the beginners, get this kit. For the experienced, this is a wonderful source of information that you may have overlooked in your years of reading. I’ve found that re-reading and exploring the basics made me a better reader.

Thank you U.S. Games Systems, INC. for this wonderful opportunity to review this kit for you. Much appreciated and I look forward to working with you in the future.

The Halloween Tarot Book and Deck

The Halloween Tarot
Tarot
Karin Lee
New Age
U.S. Games Systems
1996, 2006
Paperback
137
U.S. Games Systems for review

Black cats, ghosts, and jack o'lanterns offer enchantment and light-hearted perspectives in this lively Halloween Tarot Book.

The Halloween Tarot deck comes in a tin with a companion book sold separately.

The Halloween Tarot deck comes in a tin with a companion book sold separately.

U.S. Cards Games System sent me the Halloween Tarot deck and companion book …

for review. I love absolutely love Halloween! My goal was to post The Halloween Tarot before the spooky holiday. However, the Halloween Tarot doesn’t have to be restricted to Halloween.  A few days later I started reading The Easiest Way to the Learn Tarot-Ever!! and I was stunned. In The Easiest Way to Learn Tarot Ever!!, the author suggests that, as a starter deck, you use a Rider-Waite deck and/or the Halloween Tarot created by Kipling West. I was surprised because the deck appears to be a novelty deck but Dusty White, the author of The Easiest Way to Learn the Tarot, held it as high esteem as the Rider-Waite decks. (I also received the deck and book set of Exploring Tarot Using Radiant Rider-Waite.)

 As soon as I saw the Halloween deck mentioned in that book, as a semi-equal deck to the Rider-Waite, I realized the treasure I now owned. I have two of the few decks that The Easiest Way to Learn Tarot-Ever!! suggests that a Tarot user buy and I’m honored that U.S. Games System, Inc. was kind enough to add these two to my collection. 

The Halloween Tarot was created by…

Kipling West, whose favorite holiday is Halloween (I wasn’t too surprised by that revelation). There is a book that is a companion to this Tarot deck that is sold separately, but I do have it for review in this post as well. The deck comes with the traditional little white book, but it doesn’t go as far in depth as the Halloween Tarot book does. I’ve gone over my first reactions to the Halloween Tarot deck in theory but as soon as I opened the tin the cards came in, I was caught in lust.

This deck compared to Lenormand…

The cards are only slightly larger than the Maybe Lenormand and Under the Roses Lenormand that I own. While I love the large, weighty Tarot cards that are so common in most of the decks that are produced, this meant that The Halloween Tarot deck fits comfortably and significantly less weightier in my purse. Because I’m able to tote these cards around comfortably in whatever book bag I’m using that day, I had more opportunities to use these cards. In fact, this is most likely going to be my go-to Tarot deck when I’m away from my desk.

In The Halloween Tarot companion book it goes into further depth about the possible meanings of the cards but it let’s you come up with how they relate to the specific situation.

Let’s look at the cards…

They are printed on sturdy paper that won’t be easily damaged (especially considering that the cards came in a brightly colored tin). The graphics are well printed, you can’t see the many dots that litter the page to create the drawings that are so creative and dark. And, for that matter, when I say “dark” I literally mean that these cards are dark. Each card depicts a creature–usually a humanoid–with a black background that has several stars and, always, a black cat.

The black cat:

The black cat is explained in The Halloween Tarot as a touchstone, a companion that will lead you along through the Tarot. The book also goes on to say that “Sometimes he reflects the meaning of  the card, but sometimes he’s just a casual observer.”

The cat in the Halloween Tarot deck is displayed in every single one of the cards. I noticed something about the cat. It was always looking at the main player in the deck, which drew my eyes to the most important figure that I should be paying attention to. In that respect, it was like a shortcut in my reading. If I was stuck, as it occasionally happens, I was able to follow the cats gaze to see what I should be looking at. There is one card that drew my attention: the Two of Imps, the equivalent of the Two of Wands in the traditional decks. The cat in the Two of Imps was looking at the massive figure holding the two Imps. My eyes were drawn to the two figures fighting but the cat was looking at the main dish. When I looked at the figure I felt the commanding presence and saw that it was in a position of power where it could resolve conflict.

As I mentioned in the beginning of the review, I was also sent the companion book.

This book provides a background of Halloween and the authors special connection to it. Then, the author informs the reader how the tradition of Halloween developed through time and how the Tarot came to be connected to Halloween. I found out, through the Halloween book, that the tradition of Halloween began with the Celts and warped through decades to create the modern Halloween. While the Halloween book is longer than the LWB (little white book) gives you plenty of information, that information is expressed through three or so sentences about what the card could mean.

The Halloween Tarot book goes into incredible depth and explores the art of the card, the possible meanings, and the “divinatory meanings.” I was quite pleased with the latter, in that it helped the reader come out of a bind if their intuition isn’t all that up to par in the moment.

A typical reading leads you through chapter 3 of The Halloween Tarot, presenting an example routine to follow when reading. It’s as specific as telling you to unwrap your tarot from “its silk or cotton cloth (keeping it unscathed by outside influences) and gives you the deck to shuffle so that your essence will somehow rub off on the cards” (pg 21). This is something that is not often addressed and I was pleased to find that The Halloween Tarot companion book goes into such detail. While it does suggest specific things to do while reading/how to read, it doesn’t limit you to that.

As is true with every Tarot book I’ve read (and, trust me, I’ve read a lot) the book offers a few different card spreads to get you started. The rest of the book is sorted into the Major Arcana and their meanings and then it goes through the four suites, aptly named “Imps”, “Pumpkins”, “Ghosts” and “Bats” to match the theme of the deck. The book dedicates a whole page to introducing each of the suits as you read and practice.

Then, at the end of the book, are several pages for “notes” though it was much too few for me. (I opted to take notes in my Tarot journal.) I found that the section “More books about Halloween and Tarot” was very clever, addressing both children and adults.

Who would like this deck and/or companion book?

  • Those looking for a unique deck
  • a smaller deck
  • a deck that’s easy to tote around
  • a book that delves into the history of this great craft
  • someone who is looking for a brief history of Tarot and Halloween
  • those looking to understand the Tarot in regards to this spooky holiday
You can see my review cross-posted on my spirituality blog where I review mostly divination books and decks.

Tarot for Life by Paul Quinn

Tarot For Life Book Cover Tarot For Life
Paul Quinn
Non-fiction, New Age
Quest Books
2009
Paperback
344
Publisher

Paul Quinn transforms the Tarot from fortune-telling into the ultimate self-help tool for intuitive guidance, empowerment, and well-being. Discover how to apply the Tarot, as a lifelong resource, to access inner wisdom and gain deeper insights and practical, inspired guidance in relationships, career, family, and personal growth. With illustrations from the Universal Waite deck, the book offers 78 engaging casebook examples (one for each card) from Quinn’s readings for clients. Drawing on Jungian psychology, the Hindu chakras, and other esoteric traditions, he explains how the Tarot can reveal unconscious patterns and offer soul-directed advice leading to positive changes and greater well-being. Quinn also provides guidelines on reading the cards for oneself and others, interpreting reversed cards, handling difficult disclosures, and psychic self-care.

tarot for life

Tarot for Life by Paul Quinn

You guys, this is bad. I’ve had this book for a while now. Quest Books was kind enough to send it to me for review and have incredible patience with this reviewer, which is very much appreciated. This is a book that you should take your time on. Learning the Tarot is a lengthy process, something I’ve been working on for a few years now; however, I haven’t been studying it regularly.

The first part of Tarot for Life is informational. It introduces you to the Tarot as if you were an absolute beginner; which I consider myself to be, even though I’ve been studying Tarot on and off for a few years now. The second and third sections guide you through it; the fourth part helps you learn to read the cards. I’ve read many books on Tarot but this one stands out because of both its simplicity and how deeply it delves into the subject of introspective Tarot. One day I’d like to be able to read Tarot as a professional but right now I’m using Tarot as a tool for my spiritual journey. I use one card (almost) every day to guide me throughout the day and this is what the books’ purpose is: to provide a look inside yourself.

In the beginning of the book Quinn has a section “Tarot Beyond Fortune-Telling,” which I found quite useful. Like I said, until I have enough practice and knowledge of the Tarot I’m reading for myself, and I’m not reading with the intent of having my future told.

IMG_6425

Zombie Tarot; Housewives Tarot; Steampunk Tarot; Tarot for Life

Now, the book does talk about how novelty decks (like my Housewives Tarot) aren’t as powerful, something I disagree with. For instance, I have a deck called “Happy Tarot” which I absolutely love because it sets my day on a positive note. I also have Zombie Tarot and Steampunk Tarot which I use as inspiration for my writing. Each deck of mine serves a different purpose, a purpose for whatever my intent is for that day and each deck is valuable and special to me.

Some sources  feel as though reverse cards should be interpreted differently and this book let’s you decide for yourself which way works for you. For me, as a beginner, I just turn those cards over so they’re right-side up because the Goddess knows I am not skilled enough to take that to the next level. Does this affect the reading? Probably, but, like the purpose of this book, I’m doing this for me, for “Everyday Guidance and Growth.” It’s a personal decision of mine that I think deserves respect and this book gives it.

This book is for the absolute beginner. It guides you through the Tarot and how to read the cards and personalize it for yourself. Tarot for Life is a valuable addition to my shelf of New Age whatsits.

*Psst* Follow me on Goodreads to see more of my books related to the Tarot and “New Age.”

My 2016 Resolutions–Bookish and Otherwise

 By posting these resolutions I’m holding myself responsible to complete them regularly. 

My health

  1. 4 days out of the week I need to get 10,000 steps that day. NO EXCEPTIONS UNLESS I’M DEATHLY ILL. Or have a cold. You know, whichever.
    1. I need to walk 5 days a week
  2. Yoga 2x a week, the length doesn’t matter
  3. A month-long elimination diet to help my migraines
    1. Maybe I’ll revisit being Vegan again. It worked out pretty well for me last time.

Bookish/Writing Resolutions

  1. I will read all 2015 review books
  2. Meet Goodreads challenge
    1. Read my books on reading
  3. Journal at least 5 out of 7 of the days of the week, like I did when I was younger
  4. I will regularly upload stories to OWW SFF so I can keep getting writing feedback
    1. I will get a poem, story or two published SOMEWHERE. Anywhere. I just need to get my name out there.
    2. I will continue to work on my book(s)*

Blogging Resolutions

  1. I will blog/booktube regularly, *“regularly” to be determined at a later date*
  2. At least every other book I read I will review on my blog(s)

Spiritual stuff and all that jazz

    1. I will implement a form of insightful tools like tea leaf and Tarot card reading at least twice weekly, if not carrying around a Tarot card daily
  1. On that note, I will actually learn the Tarot
  2. I will meditate at least once a week
    1. I will burn candles to my hearts’ desire, picking the color depending on my mood
    2. I’ll set the spirit with incense
  3. I will pick something and law of attraction the shit out of it every day/week/month
  4. I will go out of my way to think positively, especially when something happens that brings me down

Randomness

  1. Somehow, somewhere, I will meet this years monies goal. I can do this. I CAN DO THIS.
  2. I will move out. I don’t care where, I will just get my own place, however that pans out >.<

Pornographic Tarot and the (admittedly) Less Interesting Books I got this Past Week.


Something I did not anticipate when I purchased the Royo Dark Tarot Deck: a pornographic deck. Not that I’m complaining, there’s plenty of female eye candy. To Royo: thank you. Thank you for that little, unexpected treat. There will be a review of this deck of Tarot, but that’s for later, when I have more experience using them.

The second book I got from Netgalley in the form of an ebook: The Girl from the Well. Creepy stuff, man. Well, at least in the beginning. Click here to see my video review. 

Even though I wasn’t a huge fan of The Girl I requested the second book, The Suffering because I need to continue the story, even if the ending of the first book was pretty definite. 

I then ordered from Amazon Writing Monsters and The Emotion Thesaurus: A Writer’s Guide to Character Expression. The latter is a reference book that I haven’t even skimmed through yet (I’m heightening the anticipation), the former is not so much a reference book as a workbook.

Finally, I requested a second title from Netgalley, Anodea Judith’s Chakra Yoga. She’s an author I’m familiar with, having read her (arguably) most popular book The wheels of Life, a book that introduces readers to their Chakra system and how to care for it. I actually requested this one on accident, I thought I was requesting Tarot and the Chakras. #Fail 

Regardless, I now have a wealth of books to keep me occupied for some time. Unfortunately, I have many of those so while I’m reading I’m constantly distracted by my other books. #CommonReaderProblems